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FCC set to pass net neutrality proposal

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You may not agree with everything that the FCC does, but in regards to the Internet, they’ve at least been looking out for us little people lately. When Comcast was disrupting peer-to-peer file sharing on their network in 2008, the FCC actually hopped in to investigate and uphold a complaint against them. Now, with net neutrality one of the hot topics on the table these days, the agency is once again taking a stand. Specifically, they are poised to pass regulations on it, ones that appear to be friendlier to users than corporations, reports The Washington Post.

What exactly is net neutrality, you might ask? Imagine corporations lobbying Internet providers to give them preferential treatment, so that their websites will load much faster than another’s. Not exactly a pretty thought, isn’t it? Net neutrality is, as the name would suggest, a principle in which such things cannot happen; no preferential treatment may be given to one website or service over another by an Internet provider.

The proposal, outlined by FCC chairman Julius Genachowski, would “forbid both wired and wireless Internet service providers from blocking lawful content.” Essentially, providers wouldn’t be able to prefer one over the other; speeds would continue to be determined by today’s standards and not by how much providers are getting lobbied.

While the five-member commission won’t officially vote on the proposal until later today, it is said to have majority backing.

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