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Next Little Things: R. Stevie Moore, Pig Heart Transplant, Eartheater, and more

Artists and recordings neglected by the mainstream.

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Original artwork by Cap Blackard (Buy Prints + More)

Next Little Things is a monthly round-up of limited-run, mostly experimental vinyl/tape releases, reviewed by Grant Purdum.

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Almost nothing in the music world happens at random; there are no overnight success stories. Every band that makes it was at one point a band that hadn’t yet made it; not only that, but for every said band rolling in adulation and hype, there are dozens of equally vital groups that never got a shot, and will never get a shot.

It was never a conscious decision, but over the years it’s become my mission to shine a light on the mysterious underground machine that occasionally spits out a winner like Interpol or Arcade Fire. This is a space wherein art is still art; where people with nothing to lose create because they can’t imagine living their lives any other way. As a corollary, I want to document their output because I can’t imagine living my life any other way. I am constantly challenged and delighted by what I find bustling under the hood of the music-industry mainframe. The deepest recesses of the indie underground, while not immune to the problems that plague the more profitable sectors of the music world, to me represent a more inclusive, authentic source of inspiration.

Let the ultra-laminated chase the Next Big Thing down the rabbit hole. In this column, I aim to uncover the artists and recordings the mainstream neglects, with one caveat: I can’t guarantee the artists I cover won’t eventually become Next Big Things themselves. Or, at least the Next Little Things.
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William S. Burroughs – Nothing Here Now but the Recordings LP [Dais]

wsburroughs Next Little Things: R. Stevie Moore, Pig Heart Transplant, Eartheater, and moreI’ve heard William S. Burroughs recite his own poetry, not to mention R.E.M. lyrics, but the “montage technique” employed in this collection of his works on tape is a dramatic departure from what I’d expected or even dreamed possible. Nothing Here Now but the Recordings is an LP-only release (that’s right, not even digital) that cobbles together selections from an archive in Kansas, and by the time these tracks hit your ear, others will have been involved, including Throbbing Gristle’s Genesis P-Orridge and Peter “Sleazy” Christopherson, and writer/editor James Grauerholz. And there’s more: These artifacts were dubbed under the guise of a cut-up technique devised by Brion Gysin, and thus they skip around gleefully like a Books LP. A few instrumental sections and radio patch-ins aside (likely recorded secondhand), what you get is the booze- and drug-addled author at his OUT-est. His words, and even his voice, are being manipulated, but his presence benefits from the incursions, brilliantly succinct quotes standing out like beacons. “A green fix should last a long time,” he blurts; that’s a more predictable line from the author of Junkie, but check this: “Your planet has been invaded … Get out and fight for your streets … Boys, take the place apart … All of you green people, crab people, blue heavy metal people … All out of time, all into space, forever; you cannot take words into space.” And that’s just me jotting down random selections I’m hearing at this moment. Imagine two full LP sides of it, in context, buttressed by a romantic accordion or two and that deeeep, anything-but-soothing voice you’ve undoubtedly heard before. Nothing Here Now but the Recordings isn’t for everyone, but few things worth anything are.

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Yannick Dauby – Tsi̍t lâu tsuí:流水 Penghu Experimental Sound Studio Vol.1 LP [Discrepant]

3mmCover_OPTI [Converted]Yannick Dauby isn’t easy to connect to any common cause, flitting between several experimental spaces while simulating the overarching dominance of nature with large tidal rushes and dreamcatchers tossed about by gusts of wind. Tsi̍t lâu tsuí:流水 Penghu Experimental Sound Studio Vol.1 surges as regularly as the tide while it presents a bevy of treats for the ear to latch onto, finding purchase somewhere between the kitchen-sink approach of Starving Weirdos, the on-the-spot brilliance of labelmate Gonzo, and the natural cycles of the Wired Open Day recordings on Taiga Records (involving Oren Ambarchi and others). It’s a lot to process if you’re not lying on your back in a record room or spacing out with headphones on the bus, so take the proper precautions before you commit to each side of the LP. That’s not a warning, that’s an endorsement, by the way. The clarity, intensity, soulfulness, and even-handed compositional prowess of Penghu Experimental Sound Studio Vol.1 is daunting, even when measured next to the general excellence of the releases by Dauby’s peers on Discrepant Records.

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Russell St Bombings – Russell St Bombings [Smartguy]

russell st bombingsMembers of Total Control, UV Race, and a few other Aussie heavyweights get together for an underground version of The Traveling Wilburys, and wouldn’t you know it? The results ring as true as anything these fellows have managed on their day jobs. Russell St. Bombings practically render punk obsolete with their mastery of junkyard instrumentation and vocals as tossed-off as a finished smoke, delving deep into an improvisational zone that seems to have organically become several solid chunks of composition. I don’t know how else you come up with this dreamy, free-falling muck, faintly rooted in riffs, yet open to all manner of exploration, from triple-layered acoustic guitars to blasts of noisy mist to multi-tracked vocals to found-sound fungus. What sets this self-titled effort apart is the level of commitment to the journey from start to finish, these seasoned vets saluting Albert’s Basement (Aussie tape label, fellow travelers) as they dip into shoegaze, instrumental ragas, anti-ballads, solo synth-with-a-twist, and anything else they can get their grubby hands on. This one drops Feb. 24, so be on the lookout.

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Eartheater – Metalepsis CS [Hausu Mountain]

3-Panel_JCard_FRONT_AII was a little weirded out when I went to PsychFest last May and saw Guardian Alien performing as a duo, with Greg Fox (Liturgy) on drums and newcomer Alexandra Drewchin on synths and vocals. Hearing Drewchin’s solo output as Eartheater, however, has clarified the reasons for the downscaling of GA, as she is quite the forward-thinking artist in her own right, stepping into a deeper-than-usual lo-fi realm that reeks of home-recorded John Frusciante. In fact, Drewchin samples my favorite homemade Frusciante joint, “Running Away into You”, at the beginning of “The Internet Is Handmade”, which alone is endearing. Of course, her appeal reaches a lot farther than that; Metalepsis is like a clumsy bear-hug, wrapping its arms around seemingly everything and nothing at once. Drewchin deals in tape loops and all manner of unidentifiable audio, serving as an underwater version of what Kassie Carlson from Guerilla Toss puts out as Jane La Onda/Size Queen. Eartheater captures enough magic on Metalepsis to warrant more output; let’s hope this isn’t just a passing fancy of a project.
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Tsembla – Terror & Healing LP [New Images]

tsembla front small Next Little Things: R. Stevie Moore, Pig Heart Transplant, Eartheater, and moreListening to a Tsembla composition is like staring at a complicated stained-glass piece of art: What truly shocks you isn’t its vivid colors or shiny nature (as rewarding as those aspects are) so much as the organizational heft, not to mention patience, it requires to assemble hundreds of tiny, hand-crafted snippets into a cohesive whole. Terror & Healing, Marja Johansson’s third album under the Tsembla banner, is, at first blush, a scattered mess, until you realize Johansson is channeling the chaos into smaller rivulets that flow into a larger body of sound. A multi-layered approach to songcraft isn’t a novel concept, but few of its purveyors betray such uncanny organizational ability, cohering challenging, varied content while flaunting the chops to shut down a noise dive when necessary. Johansson samples like a madwoman, stutters half her beats and slows down her melodies to a crawl, all while maintaining a semblance of order and balance, not to mention variety. Tomutonttu, Excepter, and Gonzo are the first peers that pop to mind if you’re looking for solid footing, and I might be crazy, but might a few of the Ensemble Economique, or even Expressway Yo-Yo Dieting, folks delight in it as well? Let’s hope so. I first came across Tsembla seven-odd years ago, care of a ridiculously striking 7-inch on Vauva Records, then lost sight of them, so it was gratifying to stumble upon Terror & Healing a few weeks back. If you make time for any record in this column, let it be this one.

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Ô Paon – Fleuve LP [self-released]

a1827046161 2 Next Little Things: R. Stevie Moore, Pig Heart Transplant, Eartheater, and moreNot many of you paid attention when Geneviève Castrée quietly changed her nom de plum from Woelv to Ô Paon in 2007 or so. But the few who heard Woelv’s brilliantly packaged LP on K Records and (subsequently) Ô Paon back then have remembered because of the delicate balance Castrée toes between Aislers Set-style punk and longform drone. Now that drone is a household word (if you live in a cool household) and female punks have infiltrated the underground in large numbers, you’d think it would be time for Ô Paon to start getting love from fans of Weyes Blood and the like. But it’s not that simple, as Fleuve, like its predecessors, is a complex, achingly lo-fi underground document that isn’t going to wrap its arms around you right away. You’ll need to listen and listen closely, and if you try to pull a single out as a representative track, you’ll be missing so much subtlety you might as well not even bother. Yes, that’s how strongly I feel about the quality of Fleuve; give it a chance, for REAL, or accept that you don’t possess the patience for it. Complicated, warm-blanket experiences like “Voie Maritime” and “Transcanadienne” deserve nothing less as they scrape away the dividers between indie-rock, tape-drone, punk, and even a little noise. With so many sound sectors being covered, Castrée’s mellifluous vocals serve not only as decoration, but as a way to organize the disparate moods and flavors. Fleuve dropped in late January to few plaudits; let’s change that two ears at a time.

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Pig Heart Transplant – For Mass Consumption LP [Iron Lung]

a0370259467 2 Next Little Things: R. Stevie Moore, Pig Heart Transplant, Eartheater, and moreJon Kortland, the dungeonmaster of Pig Heart Transplant, also forms one half of noted Seattle power-violence duo Iron Lung. Don’t look for evidence of that within For Mass Consumption; while a blast-beat or two sneaks by, and the overall mood is grim, Kortland is playing more of a noisenik role here, presiding over a post-industrial throb that could shut down the electrical grids of entire cities. Every ear-bombing track ­— 28 in all, 14 per vinyl side — is roughly 44 seconds long, and each carries a moniker four letters long (examples: “Pigs”, “Scum”, “Home”, “Numb”, “Dirt”) if you’re into that. What I find most rewarding is the attention-sucking presence of this record, pressed on heavy 45 RPM wax, so the highs click and the lows plug hard. It’s like hearing a noise band hurling its wares at a hardcore band and vice-versa, just to see if the result sticks. And it does, it does; future-thrash from an individual who knows how to bring it.

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Schneider Kacirek – Shadows Documents LP [Bureau B]

bb175 cover Next Little Things: R. Stevie Moore, Pig Heart Transplant, Eartheater, and morePeruse Shadows Documents with an open ear, as your first impression might lead you down the wrong path. A pleasing set of low-key electronic bliss could turn out to be a cold-wave take on a minimalist strain of prog, care of Schneider Kacirek (the duo of Stefan Schneider and Sven Kacirek ). Throw in more substantial live drumming reminiscent of Lymbyc System and you have a quagmire on your hands, care of members of To Rococo Rot and Kreidler, two ensembles that were known, among other things, to come across as very cold and calculating, very German. And (drumroll please) there’s a hook: Shadows Documents is a grouping of, well, I’ll let the press release tell you the deal: ‘Kenya meets Krautronics.’ While the territory traversed here is not simplistic enough to adhere to such trite phrases, I can live with it because Schneider and Kacirek authentically attempted to filter the sounds of Africa through a digital lens. I’m not sure how much of that came through the other side, but Shadows Documents is nothing if not a powerful document; the backstory I can take or leave.

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Gareth Flowers & Josh Mason – Silent Period LP [Sunshine Ltd.]

gareth flowers and josh mason silent period album cover Next Little Things: R. Stevie Moore, Pig Heart Transplant, Eartheater, and moreAt first it seems reductive to slap a jazz bumpersticker on this duo just because one of them, Gareth Flowers, is a trumpeter. As Silent Period progresses, the doubt recedes: While indebted to the drone tradition front-and-center, a cool, late-night loft component is essential to the music Flowers and underground vet Josh Mason (Scissor Tail, Tape Drift, Digitalis among his conquests) make together. A lot of purples and blues, if you get right down to it; Silent Period doesn’t leave you wanting more, it just leaves you. These two know how to keep artistic distance, never revealing much more than an array of soft tones and trumpet lines that keep it straight and often short. If this coupling is to become a trend, I have some other duos I’d like to pitch to the Gods, but for now Silent Period is a fantastic start.

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Trevor Wishart – Red Bird: A Political Prisoner’s Dream LP [Sub Rosa]

 Next Little Things: R. Stevie Moore, Pig Heart Transplant, Eartheater, and moreTrevor Wishart surged far beyond the boundaries of found sound, noise/exp., and sampledom when he recorded Red Bird: A Political Prisoner’s Dream at University of York Electronic Studio between 1973 and ’77. Wishart’s music can be funny, scary, foggily mysterious, sexy, random, calculated, and/or all of the above, and whether you think you’re hearing a gang of bats flapping their way out of a cobwebbed cellar or a Betty Boop cartoon chopped and respooled, you’re probably wrong. Echoes of what Wishart achieved wherein can be heard in the work of fellow travelers like Jeff Keen, Orchid Spangiofora, and Negativeland (RIP Ian Allen). It was in these artists that the seeds of Red Bird bloomed. Viewing Wishart’s creation as an influential footnote misses the point, however. Red Bird is the real deal, and it all starts with the birds. Whether emitting high-pitched cackles or lower moans, our fair-feathered friends have wingprints all over this LP. If you subscribe to weirdo labels like Ultra Eczema, Feeding Tube, or Hanson, you already know about Sub Rosa, but it never hurts to be reminded.

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German Army – Clan Chieftains CS [Handmade Birds]

HB-081The German Army advanced; I kept getting tapes wrapped in newspaper, one after the other. Then an LP or two. Slowly, a perverse relationship developed, and here we are, 10-odd reviews later; you’d figure boredom would have set in like the dull pangs of regret, but no: More than ever, I’m in this mysterious group’s corner. Clan Chieftains is icily elusive and cold(wave)er than past releases, replete with the signifiers we’ve all grown accustomed to in the age of Liars, Weird comps, and Joy Division worship (deep, detached vocals, rules-free bass, lots of programmed synthesis), yet it strives to achieve so much more. German Army don’t flinch in the face of change. In the case of Clan Chieftains, that means more sampling and a lot of complicated, often hand drum-led rhythm schemes. I’m not sure if the thunderous displays aid their sub-level, underground style of songwriting, but soon after “Return Pure” delivers a catchy, odd-pop number that could end up representing a turning point. Then it’s back to that shadowy style that claws at your ears from the darkness of the forest; hopefully you’re expecting, and appreciating, that by now.
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夕方の犬(U ・ェ・) – ʕ•̫͡•ʕ•̫͡•ʔ•̫͡•ʔ•̫͡•ʕ•̫͡•ʔ•̫͡•ʕ•̫͡•ʕ•̫͡•ʔ•̫͡•ʔ•̫͡•ʕ•̫͡•ʔ•̫͡•ʔ♡ CS [Constellation Tatsu]

a2283531625 10 Next Little Things: R. Stevie Moore, Pig Heart Transplant, Eartheater, and moreWading through mountains of tapes can become dispiriting if you value creativity over never-ending genre slams. That’s why, when I stumble across an outfit like 夕方の犬(U ・ェ・), I drop everything for them, font issues or no. ʕ•̫͡•ʕ•̫͡•ʔ•̫͡•ʔ•̫͡•ʕ•̫͡•ʔ•̫͡•ʕ•̫͡•ʕ•̫͡•ʔ•̫͡•ʔ•̫͡•ʕ•̫͡•ʔ•̫͡•ʔ♡ is a must-grip for so many reasons, and not just because ever-so-faint traces of early Animal Collective pop up like hot tarts. It’s a soulful drone exercise that stretches the genre’s boundaries so far I hesitate to paint it with that brush. However, if the tag fits, hang it; this is a near-continental drift that makes no use of rhythm whatsoever. The fact that so few drone artists have challenged themselves to pick up the mic is just-plain sad, so to hear 夕方の犬(U ・ェ・) do it so successfully now, well … This could end up being quite the influential six-song experiment, and its extremely scant running time is a plus, winning your heart then disappearing out the door before you can say thank you. There’s even some soul singin’ that, to me, beats the hell out of Makonnen. Don’t be afraid to embrace Evening of the Dog (that’s the translation Google spit out anyway); people will be talking, and beyond that, you and I both know your heart could use a little love.

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Jacob Kirkegaard – 5 Pieces 3XCS [Posh Isolation]

PI143CS_CUJacob Kirkegaard’s 5 Pieces isn’t a collection of drone/minimalist pieces as much as it is a meditative smattering of life experiences splayed across six sides of tape. Depending on which side you choose to navigate at any given time, you could either end up drifting into space, witnessing the mellowest volcanic eruption in the history of man, getting trapped in a tesseract memory dump straight out of Interstellar, or lying face-up on your lawn as a million sprinklers dot your clothes with water droplets. Kirkegaard’s compositions start as field recordings, but with his unique touch they become mini-suites that stretch like rubber and stick in the mind like the radio songs of your youth. If you lap up longform artists like Kyle Bobby Dunn, Jim Haynes, or Stephen Mathieu (not to mention Kirkegaard peers such as Else Marie Pade), 5 Pieces (no relation to the Scott Walker comp In Five Easy Pieces) will sidle up nicely to the other drone-indebted works on your tape shelf.
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Quicksails – Spillage CS [Tranquility]

a2370118054 2 Next Little Things: R. Stevie Moore, Pig Heart Transplant, Eartheater, and moreThe mission of Quicksails’ Ben Billington (also drummer for Tiger Hatchery) over the years has been to derive aural warmth from cold digital sources. With Spillage, Billington trips over a faulty beat or two, but serves up enough intrigue to set his project, once again, apart from the experimental synth-dro hordes. He seems most at ease — and thus, so will you — when he’s exploring vast expanses of space and filling in small details rather than covering everything in neon. Don’t shortchange him, though, as he knows how to break out the paint-shaker when things are turning drab, not to mention his prowess when it comes to ping-ponging digital sequences off each other. I also seem to recognize a few of these sounds from an old computer program that taught me how to spell and included pixelated dinosaurs in its learning tools. Easily enough variety to justify repeat tape-flips if not the gravity to send you screaming into the wilderness; Spillage sends you to the edge, not over it, and when you hear what I mean, you’ll agree it’s for the best.

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R. Stevie Moore – Ariel Pink’s Picks 2XLP [Personal Injury]

thumb_325_tmp_2F1416600801987-lo94huaw66uk57b9-3774ec7129f1e481f8bd4b8576686949_2F655035050515I interviewed Ariel Pink once in 2004, just after I had seen he and his crack band struggle mightily at SXSW. Back then he was a confused kid in his mid-20s, getting heat from Pitchfork critics, trying to put an adequate live show together, and staying with his parents (with no plans to move out) in San Diego. Among the many themes repeated by the plucky Pink was his absolute adoration for R Stevie Moore. Strangely, I’m just now getting around to hearing Moore’s music for the first time, a full decade after Pink practically begged me to check it out. I suppose I was reticent to pick up Moore’s myriad material because I figured it would be even more rough and ragged, fidelity-wise, than what Pink was composing back then. On that point, I was dead wrong; the works of Ariel Pink’s Picks are of decent sound quality. The reason Moore’s songs are so interesting has less to do with lo-fi production than the odd twists and turns written into them and his whimsical voice, cushioned between the influence of Syd Barrett and any number of outsider ’70s folk musicians/Zappa acolytes. This is loner/bedroom pop before it was known as such, and even today the reverberations can be felt. I’m sure Pink’s 2014 single “White Freckles” would have existed in some form had Moore’s “Cuss Me Out” not preceded it, but it wouldn’t have achieved the resplendent tone it carries now. The selections of Ariel Pink’s Picks (which was compiled by Pink in 2006 and first released in a quickly sold-out cassette edition by Laughable Recordings in 2011) range from happy, cleanly played punk to sunny post-Kinks rockers to off-kilter ballads, each cut retaining the oversized Moore personality even when the vocals don’t appear. If you’re a sucker for dumpster-diving in the annals of pop, or Quinn Walker, or the Gulcher label, you’ll have no problem making yourself at home in Moore’s bedroom-cum-studio.

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Nick Millevoi + Dead Neanderthals – Dietary Restrictions CS [Obsedante]

a0869130671 2 Next Little Things: R. Stevie Moore, Pig Heart Transplant, Eartheater, and moreIf you’re looking to skronk out a little, Dietary Restrictions will make sure you never get around to studying tonight. Philly’s phenom guitarist Nick Millevoi is by now a familiar presence in the minds of tape traders, and his sick jazz licks are supplemented ably by those pesky Dead Neanderthals, Otto Kokke (saxxx) and Rene Aquarius (drums). Over the course of three crystal-clear live recordings, this trio locks in so hard it’s tough to get a breath in, and as the momentum builds and builds, their combined might coheres into a solid brick. When it smacks you in the face, it’s going to hurt; accept that now and you might just make it all the way through. Dead Neanderthals represent some of the best back-up Millevoi’s had, and he relishes the chance to ratchet up the intensity then let it down a notch, allowing the other players to the front. Bookended by two straight-up thrash fests, “No Coriander” might be the best of the batch, stretching out for a minimalist exercise that offers not only a respite from the deluge, but a series of compelling arguments for accentuating space without filling it to the brim with swan-diving sax lines and swirling cymbal swells (though that’s appreciated, too). Sign up if you dig the ugEXPLODE, New Atlantis, and Public Eyesore labels, or experimental jazz wreckage in general.

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Anduin – Last Days of Montrose House one-sided 10″ LP [Infinite Greyscale]

IGR006EP_CU_medium_imageAbout a minute or two into Anduin’s Last Days of Montrose House, there’s a sound surge after a period of relative calm. It’s reminiscent of that feeling of dread that bubbles up in your stomach when you realize you’ve taken a path you can’t turn back from. It’s an intense moment that, while not representative of Montrose in its totality, reveals the depth of Jonathan Lee’s potential depravity. He’s not an audio warmonger at all, however; if anything, he’s an audio-video soundsmith. Extremely deft with his many brushes, Lee furnishes deep, lush, widescreen ‘scapes that don’t drone as much as they roast, shift, burn, rotate, and crackle. His work as Anduin is as reminiscent of electro-acoustic as it is noise, drone, minimalist, or any other persuasion, and that’s what is new and interesting about his last few aural accomplishments: He wants no genre that would have him as a member. Appropriately, considering Lee’s fascination with sights/sounds, Last Days of Montrose House is a spectacular all-around package, complete with download-only remixes and visual components that would be but trash if the music within weren’t so genuinely pleasing. Assiduously recommended.

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Flores Del Vicio – Reach a Better Feeling CS [Opal Tapes]

a0157369370 2 Next Little Things: R. Stevie Moore, Pig Heart Transplant, Eartheater, and moreOne of the core strengths of the Opal Tapes label is its ability to sniff out electronic acts that don’t fit in with their peers. Flores Del Vicio deals in ice pick beats, maniacal bass twists, and all manner of rhythmic distractions, as many in the genre do. Yet his delivery, when each element is combined after being fastidiously honed and sharpened, results in a brand of pandemonium uncommon even among techno producers who live for the RUSH. Maybe that’s where Reach a Better Feeling gets its name, from that quest one embarks upon when standardized song formats fail to offer that “kick.” If you strip away the beats and a few of the secondary rhythms, what you really have, particularly in the case of dirty cuts like “Bob Marley Polo Shirt”, is a noise jam that never found a home. Del Vicio is happy to take the stragglers in and repurpose them as scraps of electronic bliss, and, at least in the case of Reach a Better Feeling, seems to have located a soft spot in the human psyche. I could use three more albums of this, please.

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Palmbomen II – Palmbomen II LP [Beats in Space]

cache_360_360_1__100_BIS019_COVER_1500Just to catch you up to speed on the fledgling Palmbomen empire: Palmbomen II (in the sacred tradition of Amon Duul II or, more recently, Sylvester Anfang II) is a new version of the root band that is indebted to the classic solo/solitary style of recording and is helmed strictly by founding Palbomen member Kai Hugo. The album Palmbonen II carries with it yet another layer of context: It was dubbed during a self-imposed summer lockdown in Hugo’s mother’s basement. Now that the rock-star myth has been thoroughly drained from the conversation, let us explore the synth dwellings of this Hugo fellow. For one, he was right to separate this project from the proper Palmbomen. He’s stripping his soul down to rudimentary pleasures here; no vocals, no breakdowns, no digressions. It works wonders for Hugo’s flow, which blooms like a resplendent rose over 14 tuff-dub tracks that ride the Palm/Highway Chase express to infamy, the difference being that a lot of these cutz make me wanna fuckin’ MOVE. The actual ’80s have nothing on the kids these days: Harold Faltermeyer/Beverly Hills Cop 2 keyboards, the vague inkling of in-house HR videos, flourishes of effects straight outta Karate Kid 2 … You’ll assume it’s another vaporwave gag, but Palmbomen II holds up once the kitsch has cleared, finding the exact grid wherein grime, dub, v-wave, and ____ (insert genre not invented yet) intersect. You’re gonna like Hugo; you’re gonna LOVE Hugo!

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Grant Purdum is a writer living in Corpus Christi, Texas. His work has been seen at Tiny Mix Tapes, The Wire, and The AV Club. He tweets.

To submit for Next Little Things consideration, mail Grant Purdum at:

2714 Bretshire Drive
Corpus Christi, TX 78414

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